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Dec 22, 2007

Westport Fire Department

911 Main Rd

Westport, Ma 02790

 

Sta 1                                                                                                    Sta 2

911 Main Rd                                                                                          85 Briggs Rd

508-636-1110                                                                                         508-672-0721

 

 

 

____________

Permit Number

 

Open Burning Season begins January 15th and ends May 1st.

 

Burning (with a permit) of the following materials is allowed:

-          brush, cane, driftwood and forestry debris from other than commercial or industrial land clearing for new non-agricultural purposes

-          burning must be at least 75 feet from all dwellings

-          burning must take place on land closest to the source of material to be burned

-          materials normally associated with the pursuit of agriculture, such as fruit tree pruning, dead raspberry stalks, blueberry patches for pruning purposes, infected beehives for disease control

-          trees and brush resulting from agricultural land clearing

-          fungus infected elmwood if no other acceptable means of disposal is available (disease-free brush is not an acceptable starting aid)

-          burning must be carried out between 10 AM and 4 PM

 

BURNING OF THE FOLLOWING MATERIALS IS PROHIBITED:

-          brush, trees, cane and driftwood from commercial and/or industrial land clearing operations

-          grass, hay leaves and stumps

-           tires

 

Also prohibited is the stacking, placing or storing combustible material such that the Department of Environmental Protection may presume that it will be burned.

 

While burning, someone must attend the fire until it is completely extinguished.  Have available a water supply, such as a pressurized water pump can or hose, shovels and rakes for controlling the fire. 

 

To extinguish the fire, burn the fire down to coals and spread over the coals, snow, water, sand or soil.

 

All open burning must be conducted during periods of good atmospheric ventilation WITHOUT CAUSING A NUISANCE.

 

Whoever violates any provisions of Chapter 48, Sec 13 shall be punished by a fine of not more than one hundred dollars or by imprisonment for not more than one month or both.

 

You must contact the Fire Department each day you wish to burn and request permission to do so.  It atmospheric conditions are not proper, permission will be denied.

 

When calling the Fire Department for permission to burn, you must call between 8AM and 12 noon.  You must give your permit number, name and location where the burning is taking place.

 

NO PERMITS ARE GIVEN OUT AFTER 12 NOON


Dec 22, 2007

Fire Prevention Tips

Most people know the basics, but those messages can save lives and bear repeating. Below are 10 reminders. If these guidelines are followed, a significant reduction in residential fires and subsequent damages could result.


1) Install smoke detectors in your home and test them regularly. You should have detectors on each floor of your home, in all rooms, and in a corridor outside bedrooms. It also is suggested that batteries are changed at least once a year and that smoke detectors are tested every month.

2) Draw up a home escape plan and review it with your family. Smoke, toxic gasses and fire can fill your home quickly. Residents should leave the structure immediately via their preplanned escape route. Each room should have two potential exits. Teach your family to meet at a designated location after exiting the home and never go back into a burning structure to retrieve something.

3) Never leave cooking unattended. Unattended cooking is one of the most common causes of residential fires. In addition to keeping an eye on your cooking, avoid wearing loose-fitting clothing and keep pan handles turned inwards. If a grease fire does start, the best way to extinguish it is by placing a tight-fitting lid over the top. It also is a good idea to have a fire extinguisher in the kitchen (on the exit side of the room) and know how to use it.

4) Teach your children not to play with matches and lighters. Most children have a natural curiosity about fire, but should be taught that matches and lighters are tools, not toys. Teach them to tell a grown-up if they see them in an unsafe place.

5) Use electrical appliances safely. Do not overload outlets or plug multiple appliances into extension cords. Cords should be free of knots and kinks; avoid running them under rugs or across walkways. A good rule of thumb with extension cords use is that it is at least the same size in diameter as the appliance cord. Unplug heat-producing appliances when they are not in use.

6) Take care when using heating devices. A three-foot clearance around portable heating devices is recommended. Maintain the device properly, including ensuring the wires are in good condition. Never attempt to dry clothes on or near a heater. Always turn off a portable room heater before going to bed.

7) Safely discard smoking materials. Thoroughly extinguish smoking materials in ashtrays that are cleaned out regularly. Do not throw smoking materials in the trash or out of car windows.

8) Use good habits when burning candles. Candles should be extinguished when leaving the room or going to bed. They should be kept out of the reach of children and away from pets.

9) Store flammable materials safely. Use approved containers for all flammable and combustible liquids. Keep them away from ignition sources (appliances with pilot lights, etc.). Ventilation and avoidance of heat build-up in the storage area should be maintained.

10) Do not burn trash or leaves. It not only can be unsafe, it's illegal in the Town of Westport.  Brush burning season is from January 15th to May 1st.


Dec 22, 2007

Smoke detectors save lives, but only if they are properly installed and functioning. Most fire fatalities happen in homes without working smoke detectors.


SMOKE ALARM FACTS:


Install

It is recommended that you install at least one smoke detector on every level of your home, including the basement. Even better is one in every bedroom. Smoke detectors are designed to wake you up if a fire starts while you are sleeping. Be sure your smoke alarms are near bedrooms and other sleeping areas in your home.

Test

When was the last time you heard your smoke alarm? Battery-operated alarms should be tested once a month to make certain they are working.

Change

Replace the batteries in your smoke detectors twice a year. It is recommended that you do this when we change your clocks to Daylight Savings Time.

Replace

Replace your smoke detector every ten years. After ten years, your smoke detector will have been working consecutively for 87,000 hours. No other appliance in your home works this long. If you do not know how old your smoke detector is, or if it is ten years or older, replace it as soon as possible.


Dec 26, 2007

Carbon monoxide is commonly known as “the silent killer.” Because it is colorless odorless, and tasteless, none of your senses can detect it. CO claims the lives of nearly 300 people in their homes each year according to the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC). CO is a potentially deadly gas that is produced by fuel-burning heating equipment, such as furnaces, wood stoves, fireplaces, and kerosene heaters. Follow these guidelines to help keep your family safer

  • Have a qualified technician inspect fuel-burning appliances at least once each year. Fuel-burning appliances such as furnaces, hot water heaters and stoves require yearly maintenance. Over time, components can become damaged or deteriorate. A qualified technician can identify and repair problems with your fuel-burning appliances
  • Be alert to the danger signs that signal a CO problem: streaks of carbon or soot around the service door of your fuel-burning appliances; the absence of a draft in your chimney; excessive rusting on flue pipes or appliance jackets; moisture collecting on the windows and walls of furnace rooms; fallen soot from the fireplace; small amounts of water leaking from the base of the chimney, vent or flue pipe; damaged or discolored bricks at the top of your chimney and rust on the portion of the vent pipe visible from outside your home.
  • Be aware that CO poisoning may be the cause of flu-like symptoms such as headaches, tightness of chest, dizziness, fatigue, confusion and breathing difficulties. Because CO poisoning often causes a victim's blood pressure to rise, the victim's skin may take on a pink or red cast.
  • Install a UL Listed CO detector outside sleeping areas. A UL Listed CO detector will sound an alarm before dangerous levels of CO accumulate. CO indicator cards and other devices are also intended to detect elevated levels of CO, but most are not equipped with an audible alarm, and cannot wake you at night, when most CO poisonings occur.
  • Read the manufacturer's instructions carefully before installing a CO detector. Do not place the detector within five feet of household chemicals. If your detector is wired directly into your home's electrical system, you should test it monthly. If your unit operates off of a battery, test the detector weekly and replace the battery at least once a year.
  • Avoid placing your detector directly on top of or directly across from fuel-burning appliances. These appliances will emit some CO when initially turned-on. Never use charcoal grills inside a home, tent, camper or unventilated garage. Don't leave vehicles running in an enclosed garage, even to "warm up" your car on a cold morning.
  • Know how to respond to a CO detector alarm. If your alarm sounds, immediately open windows and doors for ventilation. If anyone in the home is experiencing symptoms of CO poisoning -- headache, dizziness or other flu-like symptoms -- immediately evacuate the house and call the fire department. If no one is experiencing these symptoms, continue to ventilate, turn off fuel-burning appliances and call a qualified technician to inspect your heating system and appliances as soon as possible. Because you have provided ventilation, the CO buildup may have dissipated by the time help responds and your problem may appear to be temporarily solved. Do not operate any fuel-burning appliances until you have clearly identified the source of the problem. A CO detector alarm indicates elevated levels of CO in the home
  • If you have questions or concerns, please always call the Fire Department. NEVER IGNORE THE ALARM!!!!!!!!!!!!

Dec 22, 2007

Fire is hot, dark, and fast moving. It’s not light nor is it an environment that is cool enough to enter without protective gear, as is portrayed on television and in movies.  E.D.I.T.H is the fire department’s program to teach you and your family how to escape a fire in your home. You should gather your family together, discuss fire safety, draw out a plan of your home and finally, practice, practice, practice getting out alive.

Some sections to help you get started:

 

  • Keep in mind that fire is hot, dark and fast moving.

 

  • Generally speaking, smoke is what kills not flames. Smoke and heat rise so remember   to stay low and crawl below the smoke and heat.

 

  • Sleep with your doors shut. This can allow you up to an extra fifteen minutes to escape.

 

  • Draw a diagram of your home on a piece of poster board and review it with your family.

 

  • Ensure that you mark the location of your smoke detectors which should be placed on each floor, outside sleeping areas and in each bedroom. Sound the detectors so that everyone knows what they sound like.

 

  • Make sure that there are two clearly defined exits from each room, usually a door and a window.  For homes with more than one floor above grade, rope ladders are available for purchase from local retail and hardware stores.

 

  • Before exiting a room, feel the door for heat with the back of your hand. If it is hot, do not open it, use a window instead.

 

  • Teach children not to hide. They need to go to not run away from firefighters who can look rather scary in their gear.

 

  • Designate a meeting area outside of your home.

 

  • NEVER EVER call 911 from inside a burning home. Exit the home and then call 911 from a neighbor’s house.

 

  • NEVER EVER re-enter the home for any reason. Alert arriving firefighters to any persons or pets trapped in the home.

 

  • Every one should know and practice Stop, Drop and Roll.

 

One parting thought, practice, practice, practice!!


Dec 26, 2007

Order your free copy of:

 

Are You Ready?

 

A book on disaster preparedness

 

1.800.480.2520

 

(Limit one per address)

 


Dec 26, 2007

We all share the responsibility of knowing and practicing proper driving behaviors. One of the most important "rules of the road" deals with yielding the right of way to emergency vehicles.

 

 

Each day, emergency vehicles respond to urgent requests from the public. The call may be for a person that has stopped breathing, a fire alarm, or a car accident. It is the concern of all Emergency Services that response time for services be minimized. Precious minutes lost while enroute to an emergency that could be the difference between life and death.

With the advent of new sound-proof cars, high-decibel stereo systems, cell phones, and unfortunately, drivers who simply don't care about anyone but themselves, the idea of getting to an emergency scene fast is very difficult. Many times we are often faced with drivers who can't see or hear us. This creates an incredibly frustrating situation for the emergency vehicle driver, as they weave their way through traffic.

All drivers must know their responsibilities when approached by an emergency vehicle with its red lights flashing or siren sounding.


What Drivers Should Do:

 

·         Remain calm.

·         Don't panic!

·         Pull to the right and come to a stop.

·         When on a high-speed road or when there is no room to stop, slow down as much as possible.

·         When in the left lane, pull over into the right lane as the traffic in the lane to your right moves over.

·         If you cannot move to the right because of an obstacle such as a car to your right, simply stop.

·         Your prompt action will let the driver of the emergency vehicle know what you are doing; it will allow the driver to anticipate where to drive.

·         When an emergency vehicle approaches you from behind while you are stationary at an intersection stop sign or red light, do not move unless you can pull to the right.

What Drivers Should NOT Do:

·         Don't stop in the middle lane when there is room to pull to the right.

·         Don't pull to the left in the center lane or left turn lane.

·         Don't drive through a red light or stop sign when an emergency vehicle approaches from behind.

·         Don't turn quickly to the left into a driveway or street.

·         Don't race ahead to get through a green light or turn before the emergency vehicle gets there.

·         Don't disregard the presence of the emergency vehicle by continuing to drive.

 

Heavy Rush Hour Traffic

In heavy traffic, motorists in the right hand lane must pull as close to the curb as possible with motorists in the left hand lane pulling as close as possible to them. The law states that traffic in both directions must pull to the right and stop. When they do, there is room for the emergency vehicle to pass safely.

Turning Left In Front Of Emergency Vehicles

Motorists are obligated by law to check what is happening behind them before making a left turn. Left turns must always be aborted if an emergency vehicle is approaching from behind. The motorist should usually proceed straight through the intersection, then pull to the right and stop. The motorist must abort the left turn, by pulling to the right and stopping, being sure, of course, not to block the intersection.


Blocking An Intersection

When motorists see an emergency vehicle approaching, they pull to the right and stop before they get to the intersection. They do not turn or go until they are sure all emergency vehicles have passed. Traffic in both directions must yield to an emergency vehicle. This is critical at intersections. Motorists should pull to the right and stop before they get to the intersection--and must always yield to an oncoming emergency vehicle making a left turn.


Emergency Vehicles Leaving Their Stations

The law requires you to pull to the right and yield to an emergency vehicle, even before it gets on the road. Be alert. When you see that a fire engine or medic unit is coming out of its station, pull to the right and stop.


Pedestrians


Pedestrians are also required to get out of the way for an emergency vehicle. If, as a pedestrian, you are already on the road, get off the road as soon as possible. If you are about to cross and you see or hear an emergency vehicle approaching, don’t go on the road--stay on the sidewalk until the emergency vehicle has passed.

 

 




Page Last Updated: Dec 22, 2007 (05:35:00)
 
 
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